Where to eat at during Spring Festival? Hui noodle shops are still open.

If you are spending Spring Festival in Shanghai or Beijing, you might have noticed signs up on the doors of almost every small restaurant and shop announcing they are closed because they returned to their hometown for the holidays. A lot of large restaurants are closed, too, as staff returned home. Where to eat for … Continue reading Where to eat at during Spring Festival? Hui noodle shops are still open.

A Chinese Student’s View on #BlackLivesMatter: “Would American Blacks Want to Immigrate to China?”

Last year a Chinese author living in California, who blogs under the handle 那小兵, wrote a blog post about her experience participating in the protest over a black youth killed by police. She contrasted that protest with a protest over a Chinese students killed by a black man. Her post was widely shared and viewed … Continue reading A Chinese Student’s View on #BlackLivesMatter: “Would American Blacks Want to Immigrate to China?”

Uncle Xi, Save Us!: Shopowners Protest for Compensation from Construction-related Losses

As construction nears the end for line 4 of the Nanjing metro system, shopkeepers hurt by the construction have increased the visibility of their protests. During the third week of October, owners of restaurants and businesses along Caochang Men Avenue, where the terminal station is being constructed, put up banners with messages demanding the government … Continue reading Uncle Xi, Save Us!: Shopowners Protest for Compensation from Construction-related Losses

How Xinhua Responds to China’s GDP Growth Dropping Below 7%

China’s official GDP figures fell below 7% for the first time in six years, and Xinhua is trying to reassure readers by noting that average incomes are up. The numbers come as China’s GDP growth slows after many years above 8%. Some slowing could be expected after years of blistering growth, but many independent analysts … Continue reading How Xinhua Responds to China’s GDP Growth Dropping Below 7%

The Impact of the “Worker, Peasant, and Soldier Students” on China

From 1970-77, admissions to universities in China were based on class background, not qualifications, as I wrote about in my article on the history of the “worker, peasant, and soldier students” campaign. The impact of that campaign still holds some influence on views towards education in China. One is support for the gao kao college … Continue reading The Impact of the “Worker, Peasant, and Soldier Students” on China

The “Worker, Peasant, and Soldier Students” Program at Nanjing University

After the Cultural Revolution started universities closed their doors to new students. It wasn’t until years later that they began admitting students again—but those students were “workers, peasants, and soldiers” chosen on the basis of class discrimination rather than qualifications. Even those lucky few, however, never got proper educations from the politicized education system Maoism … Continue reading The “Worker, Peasant, and Soldier Students” Program at Nanjing University