Dancing on the streets of Singapore

By Mitchell Blatt | Culture

Jun 21

Singapore is a city-state known for peace and order. It’s a place where chewing gum is banned, and the airport refrains from doing final boarding call announcements to make it quieter. It’s not a place where you would expect to see people dancing to classic Chinese pop-rock music in the middle of a public sidewalk guangchang wu style.

But there they were on the corner of New Bridge Street and the lantern-adorned Smith Street at 8 pm shaking their hips, swinging their arms, and doing the twist. I began watching and talking to a local, and soon enough the woman had convinced me to join in singing and dancing. I have to try out the local culture where ever I go.

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Unlike Chinese guangchang wu, which features many slow 50’s and 60’s era songs with choreographed dance moves, the music in Singapore’s Chinatown is more modern, fast-paced, and swinging. The dancing is less choreographed and left up to individuals. Singapore doesn’t have the legacy of political dancing during the Cultural Revolution, which many of China’s public square dancing grannies experienced.

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Dancing at that intersection takes place every Saturday and Sunday evening, dancers said, but lately they have faced complaints over noise. About half an hour after I arrived, two police officers approached the music performer.

The dancing aunties and uncles were angry. “It’s always the same person complaining,” a few of them said.

“People can still use the sidewalk,” which was basically true, but the concentration of people did slow down, if not entirely obstruct, traffic.

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The tall officer examined the musician’s documents for a minute or two. The second officer tried to convince the travel writer to delete the photo he took of the scene. The officers left a few minutes later. The musician then began playing a little bit quieter.

By then, however, many of the original dancers had gathered to observe the public bus that had crashed into a car.

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About the Author

Mitchell Blatt is a travel writer, editor, and columnist based in China. He is an author of two guidebooks, Panda Guides Hong Kong and Panda Guides China. He has been published in National Interest.org, The Korea Times, Roads & Kingdoms, Vagabond Journey, The Hill.com, City Weekend, Silkwinds and The World of Chinese, among other outlets. See examples of his published articles.

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Mitchell Blatt is an intrepid travel writer, and an author of two top China guidebooks, who brings his readers deep into the cultures of the places he explores. Subscribe now to get real stories of real people in real places around the world delivered right to your inbox.